Web 2.0 Websites

Web 2.0 for Newbies Internet Business

Web 2.0 websites are not built using the traditional platform eventhough many people refer to the technology supporting Web 2.0 as a platform in its own right. Web 2.0 sites are noted by their ability to enhance and promote open communication among users but they operate in a much-decentralized manner than traditional sites do.

To get a better idea of how Web 2.0 works, let’s use the analogy of a corporation.

Typically, in a traditional hierarchical corporation, information is passed from the top down. You have the CEO of the company, who may pass information to the controller, who may pass information to accounting managers, who may pass information to line workers. If the company were operating like Web 2.0, everyone would disseminate information horizontally, through shared systems. Meaning, the person on the bottom of the chain of command would have instant access to the same information the person at the top of the organization might.

One marked difference distinguishing Web 2.0 from the web of old is the philosophy that supports it. Web 2.0 encourages freedom of use, and sharing among many users. It supports the disintegration of hierarchical models of use, and instead promotes a horizontal or collaborative approach to knowledge sharing. Knowledge sharing is after all, a collective effort that includes the information and expertise of multiple members within an organization, community or other forum.

What Makes Web 2.0 ummm… Web 2.0?

  • Web 2.0 encourages greater collaboration among webmasters and visitors, so that interactive communities are created on the Web.
  • Web 2.0 approaches the Web as a platform for building conversation and communities.
  • The new Web focuses more on social networking and sharing, through various means including through blogs, wikis and more.
  • The philosophy behind Web 2.0 is one that promotes participation where everyone has the opportunity to contribute to a site’s development and progress.
  • The Web no longer serves as an entity in itself, but rather as a platform individuals can use to connect to others.

Whether you are sharing photographs, personal journals or other type of information, Web 2.0 allows users to create communities from scratch, using new technologies. Some examples of Web 2.0 sites include: Craiglist, Skype, del.icio.us. Technorati, Squidoo, Flickr and more. We will talk more about some of these sites later.

Now that you have a better idea of what Web 2.0 is, let’s look at some of the different platforms used by users. Remember, not all Web 2.0 sites are alike.

Web 2.0 and Business

Web 2.0 isn’t popular among consumers only. Businesses are now realizing the potential benefits Web 2.0 has to offer. While many consumers think of popular applications like MySpace when they think about Web 2.0, many fail to connect this technology with its potential for business. Web 2.0 can also bring a lot of grief to businesses, since it allows collaboration with many users – a business that does not live up to expectations can quickly find themselves on the receiving end of hundreds and thousands of complaints (or user contributed information).

From a cost point of view, companies can reduce the expense associated with installing and configuring essential software and applications on individual computers when they take advantage of Web 2.0. Rather than have an IT manager set up, configure and maintain a company’s applications and software on corporate servers, a company can now access a vendor’s server to acquire the information they need for their company.

Companies can also share information and collaborate with one another in new and interesting ways. This will require business managers to start thinking more horizontally, moving away from a hierarchical model of communicating to one where knowledge is shared freely among employees, suppliers, vendors and even competitors.

Some company’s are even encouraging their customers to take advantage of social networks to help them advertise. GM for example allowed consumers to create commercials for some of their popular vehicles a while back. While many of these left much room for improvement, such integration allows for greater innovation and shared interest among key agents – consumers.

A company can also help businesses make working more practical and simpler. Rather than have individuals use stand-alone systems only, company’s can now encourage the joint use of software and computers among multiple users. Data can easily be shared from one person to next, meetings can be held online, and problem solving can take place from a much broader perspective.

As with anything, there are drawbacks to using this technology, even in the world of business. Business entrepreneurs have to ensure they fully understand the implications and utility of using Web 2.0 before they adopt the technology. Many must also realize that this technology has existed for some time, but offers an interactive approach to marketing and everyday business operations. A company should examine how they can integrate Web 2.0 into daily operations while still hedging risks.

Now that you have a better idea of what Web 2.0 is, let’s look at some of the different platforms used by users. Remember, not all Web 2.0 sites are alike.
Web 2.0 Sites

How do you know if you have landed on a Web 2.0 platform?

Chances are, if you are asked to contribute to the content or body of knowledge contained on the site, you’ve hit the lottery. Most sites are those that encourage visitors to add their insights to a page, whether through ongoing commentary, through editing or by any other means available.

Web 2.0 sites differ in their mission and purpose from traditional web pages. Some provide users the opportunity to share personal biographies, pictures and journals. Examples include sites like MySpace.com. This fast and growing site is popular among the young and old. Even celebrities use the site to post pictures, update their fans and promote their latest shows or movies.

One of the advantages of Web 2.0 is users can use it to express their opinions or passions, but also passively promote their products or services in the process. Here are some other common sites characteristic of this new trend.

Robert Benjamin Internet Business Opportunities

About Rob 'n Mo

I'm a man of mystery. I like anonymity, but on the WWW there is not much of it...
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